6th AAF The Caribbean Breeze
"The Caribbean Breeze" is the official publication of the Sixth Air Force. It is published by and for the men of the Sixth Air Force. The eventual monthly magazine has a format of 8" x 10-1/2" with 34 pages. It portays in many articles aspects of life and work in the Central and South American countries as artist Fred Press expresses with his magazine covers.

The Caribbean Breeze 1943 08 15
The Caribbean Breeze 1943 08 15
Detailed updates coming

The Caribbean Breeze 1943 11 15
The Caribbean Breeze 1943 11 15
Detailed updates coming

The Caribbean Breeze 1943 12 15
The Caribbean Breeze 1943 12 15
Detailed updates coming

The Caribbean Breeze 1944 01 15
The Caribbean Breeze 1944 01 15
Detailed updates coming

The Caribbean Breeze 1944 01 31
The Caribbean Breeze 1944 01 31
Detailed updates coming

The Caribbean Breeze 1944 02 28
The Caribbean Breeze 1944 02 28
Vol. IV No. 1 ... Natives of Pan-Americana . . . from the picturesque villages of Mexico to the snow-capped Andes of Chile . . . vividly portrayed in the breadth and sweep of this colorful panorama of the Caribbean. Assembled into a common group of Latin-American neighbors, they depict the unity of the New World, standing out in sharp contrast to that of the old. Rising from the ancient, highly cultured civilizations of the Aztecs and Mayans, they carry on as the reflected tradition and pageantry of the past united in their ceaseless search for a newer and finer civilization.

The Caribbean Breeze 1944 03 15
The Caribbean Breeze 1944 03 15
Vol. IV No. 2 ... Cover: These Peruvian Indians are the descendants of civilizations that flourished more than a thousand years ago. There were the Chimu of the coastal plains, the Tiahuanacans of the highlands. the Chancas of the northern forests, and on the ruins of these ancient cultures was built the empire of the Incas. This remarkable Empire was larger than the Roman Empire before Caesar. The chief of the Incas was known as the Sapa, and the form of government was a pure despotism. Religion, the law, and the militia were under the complete dictatorial domination of the Sapa, for, as the direct descendant of the Sun, he was omnipotent. He was God.

The Caribbean Breeze 1944 04
The Caribbean Breeze 1944 04
Vol. IV No. 3 ... The Cover: Bullfighting, originally introduced into Spain, by the Moors as a martial exercise, is one of the many customs that the Spanish brought with them to Latin America. A highly specialized art, each movement of the participants calls for graceful dignity and courtly gestures. Picadores, on horses that wear heavy protective matting, ride at the bull and throw their lances into the thick hide of the wild-eyed beast as he charges at them. The banderillero approaches with his two, ribboned darts in his hands. Gracefully, he draws close to the already enraged animal, throws his hat to attract its attention, and, as it thunders past, drives his darts home. More banderilleros take their turns and add their darts to those which already bedeck the powerful, plunging body. And then - the finale, the high point of the contest - the matador, the killer, advances!

The Caribbean Breeze 1944 05
The Caribbean Breeze 1944 05
Vol. IV No. 4 ... The Cover: A country of high plateaus, sky reaching peaks and incredibly blue mountain lakes, Guatemala is vibrant with life and color. Her market places are a pallette of hues both gay and brilliant. Clothed in brightly embroidered costumes, the natives scurry rapidly from place to place balancing their baskets or pottery effortlessly on their heads. The sunlight reflecting from a maze of glazed bowls spread in the center of the market, creates a brilliant, blinding glare which will cause you to turn your eyes, but here, as everywhere, you will find only pleasure in the opulence of color set to the simple patterns of the Indian. Places like Chichicastenago, Quetzaltenango, Huehuetenango, and Uaxactum tinkle their toyland names at you and challenge pronounciation. Seldom does one fail to see the men scrubbing at communal washing centers, sometimes even far into the night. For the majority of the two million Guatemalans, life remains unchanged from that of their forefathers. Spanish churches, which dominate the village squares, are thronged with worshippers who still carry vestiges of their more ancient rites to the altar of Our Lady. Everywhere the visitor finds that this is a country which at every turn is a sight through an archway .... whose people and customs have been dipped into the heart of the spectrum ... where civilizations meet, but never mingle ....

The Caribbean Breeze 1944 06
The Caribbean Breeze 1944 06
Vol. IV No. 5 ... The Cover: In this modern era there is little to remind us of the primative modes of life unless we look for recordings in libraries or museums which, in themselves, are modern housings for the ancient relics symbolizing the progress of man. Observing some of these it is difficult to imagine that somewhere a man may still exist amidst similar surroundings, unmindful of the progress of the more civilized brothers. Yet deep in the jungles of Panama may be found groups of people who have through the ages, clung to their simple and free forms of living. The Cholo Indians, a stalwart race located in Southern Panama near the Columbia border are such a group. Here, until recently, these people knew no other world than the trees and the jungle that surrounded them, they knew no other law but that of self-preservation, and their means of livelihood depended, and still does, upon the wild game, which like themselves, roam at will through the dense undergrowth. Here in Panama exist the extremes in the ages of man, both living on a common ground.

The Caribbean Breeze 1944 07
The Caribbean Breeze 1944 07
Vol. IV No. 6 ... The Cover: Although it lies directly on the Equator, the Republic of Ecuador, is not the torrid land one might presume it to be from its location. Much of the terrain is exceedingly mountainous. Two Cordilleras of the Andes traverse its length with a dozen peaks towering above 16,000 feet. Dwarfed on the map by its larger neighbors, Ecuador is not a geographical midget. As a matter of fact, the area of this republic is greater than that of the state of Texas. Its ancient inhabitants, the Incas, were among the most highly civilized Indian tribes in the New World before the white man came.

The Caribbean Breeze 1944 08
The Caribbean Breeze 1944 08
Vol. IV No. 7 ... The Cover: The "Tamborito". . . . Panama's National Dance (Record from the Government Palace, Panama City) The "Tamborito" originates with the primitive dances of the slaves who were brought to Panama by the early "conquistadores." Gradually it has taken on a new character until it is now a strange medley of modern coquetry overlaid on a background of primitive sinuous movements expressive of this most cosmopolitan country. There are several other dances native to Panama and totally different from the "Tamborito" such as the "Mejorana" and the "Cumbia." However, the "Tamborito" is generally conceded to be the most beautiful as well as the most expressive of the country. (See page 2)

The Caribbean Breeze 1944 09
The Caribbean Breeze 1944 09
Vol. IV No. 8 ... The Cover: These are the peasant people of Mexico, who now as always, comprise the vast majority of the country's population. In the veins of many of these folk flows the blood of the proud Indian tribes which once ruled Mexico. Though the conquistador oppressors may have plundered them of the outward symbols of that reign and left them nothing save ruined cities and desolated temples, there remains a fierce and undying love for liberty and independence. Gentries of unrequited toil have reduced them to an often meager subsistence for their largely undeveloped back country and primitive agriculture yields but a scant harvest. Yet these peasant folk cling with passionate devotion to the land that is theirs and has belonged to numberless generations of their people.

The Caribbean Breeze 1944 10
The Caribbean Breeze 1944 10
Vol. IV No. 9 ... The Cover: Typical of Costa Rican rural life and of its market scenes are the numerous teams of prodding oxen and the farmers guiding them. Since the country has numerous cattle, especially in the grassy uplands, oxen are commonly used as draft animals. They can cultivate the moist heavy soil of the countless small farms of the central plateau, and are a common sight on the back roads and along the highways, drawing the colorful two wheel carts. They walk slowly, with their heads invariably drooping and always seem grateful when their master places his goad on their yoke - the signal to stop and rest.

The Caribbean Breeze 1944 11
The Caribbean Breeze 1944 11
Vol. IV No. 10 ... The Cover: The textiles woven by the Indians of Guatemala are considered to be among the finest peasant art in the world. One such textile is reproduced here, overlaid with an arrangement of vignettes of the people of the Caribbean Area to simulate a tapestry. The rich ornamentation and wealth of color so often discovered in Latin America springs from the earth itself in a never ending panorama of green and blue - - of grass and trees and jungle and of sky and water. It is man who punctuates it with the flowers he cultivates, the red-roofed dwellings he builds and the costumes he wears. The little figures, typical of the Caribbean lands. Have been adapted from the 1944 Christmas Card of the Sixth Air Force.

The Caribbean Breeze 1944 12
The Caribbean Breeze 1944 12
Vol. IV No. 11 ... The Cover: The ageless charm of the Christmas story is part of the heritage of humanity, for it is bound to no single land or time or people. The hope which the Nativity of Bethlehem augured is reaffirmed in a measure with the beginning of each new life. Here its simple drama is told in the idiom of Guatemala as a Madonna of Chichicastenago holds her infant in her arms. Here too are the wise men from the East who brought gifts at the first Christmas. They are represented by three men from San Martin Chile Verde in their long robes and hooded heads.

The Caribbean Breeze 1945 01
The Caribbean Breeze 1945 01
Vol. V No. 1 ... The Cover: The unique charm of a land that time has quite forgotten typifies the islands of the San Blas Indians. Dress, laws, customs and manners have changed little since before Columbus' time. The costumes of the women, with their head scarves, elaborately decorated blouses, jewelry and peculiar nose rings are familiar sights to the tourists for whom the islands possess an odd fascination. From the time they are born, all female members of the tribe are always completely clothed. The small brown boys, however, usually run about naked. The islands number some four hundred and extend in a long chain fringing the Atlantic coast. Many of them are little more than spits of sand and coral under a luxuriant shade of palm trees. In this domain the San Blas people are sovereign.

The Caribbean Breeze 1945 02
The Caribbean Breeze 1945 02
Vol. V No. 2 ... The Cover: Early each Sunday morning thousands of Indians gather in the "Calle Real" and the Plaza of Huancayo to attend the market or "Fair." Everything is sold here. From pigs to coffins. There are few Indian markets in South America which can compare with it. Of even more interest than the varied wares are the Indian women themselves who sell the goods. They wear the coarse hand-loomed dresses and blouses so familiar among these self-sustaining Indian folk. Hats of a rough felt and invariably a wide scarf which is loosely slung over the shoulders or otherwise tied in a knot in front. And inside the scarf there may be anything at all - groceries, fagots or even a baby. Men are seldom seen without the serapes which they wear about their shoulders as protection against the cold weather of the Andean Highlands.

The Caribbean Breeze 1945 03
The Caribbean Breeze 1945 03
Vol. V No. 3 ... The Cover: Just previous to Lent each year there is a great stir while all Panama readies itself for the National Carnival. Then out come women in gay polleras and men in montunos, together with various other costumes and so the parade is on. For five days the people make merry and dance in the streets to the rhythmical bongo beat. Lovely senoritas ride past, seated on the back of open taxis, and soon the dashing caballeros race after them on tiny Panamanian ponies. The air is full of serpentine and confetti, tossed from balconies on the festive crowd beneath. Early on the mornig of the fifth day the Funeral of the Fish is conducted with mock solemnity. Once more the people regretfully return to their homes and to their work and once more the bright costumes and all the gay colors are laid away to await the coming of the next fiesta.

The Caribbean Breeze 1945 04
The Caribbean Breeze 1945 04
Vol. V No. 4 ... The Cover: Reaching down to the Southeastern part of Panama up to the Columbian Boundary lies the mountainous jungle homeland of the Darien Indian - an untamed, unexplored and still dangerous region. Adventurers lured into these wilds by tales of treasures and lost mines have seldom returned. The Darien is taller and straighter than the San Blas. He hunts with bow and arrow. Ancient shotgun or rifle and fishes with a barbed spear. His home is a platform on stilts and is roofed with palm fronds: the sides are left open. A log with niches cut into it constitutes the stairway. Darien women and men paint their bodies with colored native dyes. Patterns are varied. Following no set design but ordinarily consist of simple geometric shapes. Far away from all the world, the Darien goes about his undisturbed way in the freedom of his jungle abode.

The Caribbean Breeze 1945 05
The Caribbean Breeze 1945 05
Vol. V No. 5 ... The Cover: High in the mountains of Guatemala, not far from picturesque Lake Atitlan, lies Solola, one of the many colorful towns for which this country is famed. In the Indian language Solola means gushing water. Situated along the new International Highway, it affords a prosperous market for the handicraft and agriculture carried on by the Indians of the region. This market is held on a broad plain overlooking the lake far below. As is true of many places in Latin America -- especially those relatively isolated from modern influences and habits of living -- the people of Solola have a distinctive dress of their own. Over their red shirts the men wear short coat jackets with scroll patterns in black braid. Their knee length trousers are brightly striped in red and white. Among the most striking sights of the place are the Indian religious and civil officials with their shiny square-crowned black hats.

The Caribbean Breeze 1945 06-07
The Caribbean Breeze 1945 06-07
Vol. V No. 6-7 ... The Cover: The conquest of Peru by the early Spanish explorers was never a cultural conquest. Around the mountain cities of Cuzco and Arequipa, the former great cities of Inca Civilization. There are even today reminders of the old days. The language of the people here is still the traditional Quechua which their ancestor spoke. The costumes of the people are also part of the heritage from the past. They may seem quaint and picturesque. But every detail serves a purpose. Nothing but a wide-brimmed wool hat could be sufficient to protect one from the sunlight of the clear sub-equatorial altitudes. The scarves the women wear serve to keep out the cold. But can be quickly adapted to cradle an infant or to carry a load of wares for market. The frisking donkey colts soon become beasts of burden for the burro is still unsurpassed for carrying loads over the mountain trails.

The Caribbean Breeze 1945 08
The Caribbean Breeze 1945 08
Vol. V No. 8 ... The Cover: The cultures of Spain and the great Indian peoples have blended in Mexico time almost out of mind. The gay Charro. The Caballero of Mexico. Is ever a familiar figure upon his horse along the fashionable drives of the cities. His huge sombrero and colorful serape are of typical Indian design. Known as the " Serape de mil Colores." This cross between blanket and rug is as useful as decorative, serving as cloak, rain-cape and bed. The Michoacana of the women is typical of the lake country of Patzcuaro ( Place of Delights ), an ancient Indian Capital. In few regions of Latin America is poetry so spontaneous -- in the charm of the landscape, the dazzle of the apparel. It is scarcely to be wondered at that this part of Mexico should be famed as the home of the poets, song composers and makers of musical instruments.

The Caribbean Breeze 1945 09
The Caribbean Breeze 1945 09
Vol. V No. 9 ... The Cover: Familiar to soldiers stationed about the Canal Zone are these sturdy Jamaicans who are known locally as "Silver Workers." The men commonly work at Army Posts and other Zone installations as laborers. The women are often engaged as household domestics by Army families or civilians. Jamaicans converse in a dialect of their own, known as "Bajian." A strange mixture blending native tongues with Oxford English. In the constant tropic heat which saps the energy of the native Panamanian and U.S. Soldier alike, the Jamaican goes blithely about his business. Apparently little bothered by the temperature. Many of these people are also employed on the large banana plantations of interior Panama. Harvesting the crops and piling the heavy fruit in the holds of vessels for export to foreign markets.

The Caribbean Breeze 1945 10
The Caribbean Breeze 1945 10
Vol. V No. 10 ... The Cover: Most typical scene of the Latin Americas is the Marketplace. Some of the most colorful ones are to be found in Guatemala. Santiago Atitlan. Sloping down from a volcano to the shores of Lake Atitlan. Has one of the most unusual native markets. It is attended solely by women garbed in distinctive costume. Tall, majestic of carriage. They wear bright red skirts, white huipiles with tiny embroidered designs and halo like head dress of ten to twelve yards of colorful band tied into the hair and wrapped around the head. The men meanwhile sit around the central marketplace or on the steps of the ruins of the old colonial church. The lake, on whose shores lie several picturesque villages , has been compared to Como and Tahoe. The volcanoes which ring the lake furnish the natives with lave rock for the thatched-roof huts in which they live.

The Caribbean Breeze 1945 11-12
The Caribbean Breeze 1945 11-12
Vol. V No. 11-12 ... The Cover: Fred Press. The creator of our widely-known native type covers. Is gone and Bert Alper takes over the show window of The Breeze for a one issue stand. So it is appropriate that he devotes the cover of the final issue to the one subject nearest to the hearts of almost all of us - going home. As a low point man. Alper had to go to Cristobal to get a true slant on this high moment. What he has painted will probably give you a chuckle. That's what it is intended to do. But he has poured into it all the hungry yearning and envy that only a low-point man can muster at a sight like this. And he is still able to hang on to his sense of humor. The sailing that Alper went to see for 'Atmosphere' was of the Monterey which returned Press to the happy status of a civilian. With this issue, The Breeze is 'Short.'




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