Army Army Talks
Army TalksARMY TALKS : The PURPOSE of ARMY TALKS is to help American officers and enlisted personnel become better-informed men and women and therefore better soldiers. ..... ARMY TALKS are designed to stimulate discussion and thought, and, by their very nature, thus may often be controversial in content. They are not to promote or to propagandize any particular causes, beliefs or theories. Rather, they draw upon all suitable sources for fact and comment, in tie American tradition, with each individual retaining his American right and heritage so far as his own opinion it concerned. ..... THEREFORE, the statements and opinions expressed herein are not necessarily verified by, nor do they necessarily reflect the opinions of, the United States Army. ..... THE SOURCE OF MATERIAL must therefore be made clear at each discussion. All written material appearing in this publication has been written and edited by uniformed members of the Army and or Navy, except where it is stated that a civilian or other outside source is being quoted. ....... ARMY TALKS is a Restricted ETO U.S. Army Pamphlet published weekly. Format early issues September 1943 thru April 1945 ... 5-1/4 x 8-3/8 inches Format May 1945 and later issues ... 7-3/4" x 9-7/8" ..............................................................The Photo is Army Talks Illustrator George Withers at his drawing table at ETO headquarters in Paris. These are some of the issue's covers illustrated by George for Army Talks; 6/19/45, 7/17/45, 8/26/45, 9/2/45, 10/28/45, 11/4/45, 11/25/45, and 12/16/45. Photo courtesy of son, Brian Withers.

Army Talks 1943 09 29
Army Talks 1943 09 29
Vol. I No. 1 ....... Handbook for Discussion Leaders ....... The purpose of ARMY TALKS is two-fold : 1. To help the Officers and Men by: a. Providing information on the issues involved in U.S. participation in this War; b. Emphasizing the relation between their individual part and the total war effort ; c. Acquainting them with the strength, character and nature of the enemy ; d. Developing an understanding of our allies ; e. Developing an interest in current events as they relate to the progress of the War and the peace to follow : f. Affording opportunity for consideration of news and affairs on the American Home Front. ..... 2. To help the Army by: a. Further establishing desirable relationships between Officers and men through informal group discussions; b. Developing added pride in military service and confidence in the Command, by informing Officers and Men of significant phases of the history and traditions of the American Army, and the critical function of each major branch and service of the armed forces; c. Developing an intellectually keener Army through discussions of worthwhile topics and by relieving the routine of Army work in periods of free discussion in duty-time ; and d. Developing and maintaining a personnel generally informed on the major issues of the day, bearing upon the progress of the War and Home Affairs. ..... The first issue of ARMY TALKS will be distributed with Stars and Stripes on Wednesday 6 October 1943.

Army Talks 1943 10 06
Army Talks 1943 10 06
Vol. I No. 2 ....... War on the Supply Lines ....... The story of War on the Supply Lines was prepares by Ensign DON C. HEWITT, USMS, S/Sgt. HAMILTON WHITMAN and S/Sgt, CARL W. LARSEN, all members of the staff of The Stars and Stripes. All the material used was taken from published accounts in newspapers and magazines, or news released for publication in Great Britain or the United States. ..... The text of the following story of The War on the Supply Lines is meant to be background material to start you thinking. You should not be limited to it. There is drama in this story. There is greater drama in the everyday experiences of men and women engaged in war at sea. There is still greater drama in the hopes and fears, in the blood, sweat, and tears of the mothers, wives, sweethearts, sisters, fathers, and brothers who are keeping these men and women in War on the Supply Lines.

Army Talks 1943 10 13
Army Talks 1943 10 13
Vol. I No. 3 ....... Problems of the Pacific ....... The present issue of ARMY TALKS is intended to give men in the ETO a picture of the problems on the other side of the world. This is not only a " total war," but a world war. Conditions in the Pacific as well as conditions in Europe are our concern. The more we know of them, the better we will understand the role of our country in the present conflict. " Problems of the Pacific " presents the views of a former faculty member of the University of Hong Kong. His views may not be your views. They are not intended to be, but they are worth hearing about and knowing. The question is : What do you think? ... In reading Prof. Keeton's summary of events in the Orient, prior to the outbreak of the present war, American soldiers should remember that many of the things he says of British subjects were also true of American citizens. Americans were tried in their own courts, Americans were subject to American, not Chinese, law. Our Government maintained troops in China, as did Great Britain and other European Countries. The problems he presents as British and Chinese were also, in very large measure, American and Chinese as well.

Army Talks 1943 10 20
Army Talks 1943 10 20
Vol. I No. 4 ....... War in the Mediterranean ....... This issue of ARMY TALKS was prepared by S/Sgt. Hamilton Whitman and S/Sgt. Carl Larsen as one of the " history behind the news " series of booklets. The material was supplied by the United States Office of War Information and the British Ministry of Information. Both men were newspapermen in civil life, are now members of The Stars and Stripes staff and were detailed to the Education Branch, Special Service Division, to aid in the publication of this, and other booklets of the ARMY TALKS series.

Army Talks 1943 10 27
Army Talks 1943 10 27
Vol. I No. 5 ....... How Lend-Lease Works ....... This issue of ARMY TALKS has been prepared by members of the staff of the Mission for Economic Affairs as a basis of discussion by American Troops in Great Britain. The activities of the Mission include representation of the Lend-Lease Administration in Great Britain. ... The British War Office and Ministry of Information and the United States Office of War Information have checked on the accuracy of the facts presented in this booklet. All of the facts have appeared in official Government publications, available to the public, with one exception. The percentage of RAF planes of United States origin was made available by the Royal Air Force with permission for publication.

Army Talks 1943 11 03
Army Talks 1943 11 03
Vol. I No. 6 ....... Whats Wrong With The Germans? ....... WE have proved one thing in America: the German problem is not a racial problem; it is not a problem of blood. When a German family moves to the United States, and lives there for a generation or two, it produces as good citizens as a family from any other stock. Wendell Willkie is an outstanding example ; so in the old days was Carl Schurz. The trouble can't be blood, or inheritance. It must be surroundings. There must be something deeply wrong with the way Germans are brought up at home. Herbert Agar is the author of this issue of ARMY TALKS.

Army Talks 1943 11 10
Army Talks 1943 11 10
Vol. 1 No. 7 ....... Democracy in America ....... David Cushman Coyle, an American structural engineer by profession, was winner of Harper's $1,000 prize contest for his article " The American Way," in 1938. He is the author of volumes entitled " Roads to a New America " and " America." He is at present a consultant to the American Office of War Information, in London, and is a lecturer in the British Army education service.

Army Talks 1943 11 17
Army Talks 1943 11 17
Vol. I No. 8 ....... Pattern for Air Victory ....... The material on which this issue of ARMY TALKS is based was derived from American and British aviation sources, official reports, statements of policy by United States military leaders, press dispatches and other published accounts of the Allied air offensive in the European Theater of Operations. The overall picture it presents should give every soldier in the ETO a better understanding of the part he plays in this great assault against the enemy.

Army Talks 1943 11 24
Army Talks 1943 11 24
Vol. I No. 9 ....... What Are We Fighting For? ....... " Name off the other nations of the world and not one of them will be able to say, as the United States can say, 'We are the synthesis of the world's peoples.' And it is only the idea of freedom that holds us together the idea plus the opportunity to live and prosper within its political and economic framework. Of the Japanese Americans fighting in Italy, the Fifth Army says that they obviously believe in what they're doing, and look calmly secure because of it, and the same can be said of every other national extraction represented in our Army and Navy. Those are some of the things we are fighting for and some of the reasons why we fight. The author of the article in this issue of ARMY TALKS has carried the matter farther and has looked not only at the historical action conditioning the entry of the U.S. into the war, but has given careful consideration to The issues, confronting a world organized for peace. He does not ask for complete agreement; he seeks to suggest deep reflection on the problems which will tax the minds of all men in all nations when the war is done. Arthur L. Goodhart is the author of this issue of ARMY TALKS.

Army Talks 1943 12 01
Army Talks 1943 12 01
Vol. 1 No. 10 ....... The Battle of the Atlantic ....... This issue of ARMY TALKS was prepared by the staff of the United States Navy bureau of Public Relations in the European Theater of Operations. The information contained in it has been embodied in press releases, official Navy communiques and other official and semi-official sources. The purpose of the issue is to tell men who fight on the ground and in the air what the fellows who fight afloat have done and are doing in the job of which we are all a part.

Army Talks 1943 12 08
Army Talks 1943 12 08
Vol. 1 No. 11 ....... What We'll Find in Europe ....... This issue of Army Talks, prepared by Army Talks Section, Special Service Division, Headquarters, SOS, is largely based on a booklet written by Major Lionel Birch, R.A., and published by the British Army Bureau of Current Affairs. In doing the research, Major Birch had access to official reports on file in London, news releases, the recorded texts of German broadcasts and the stories brought out of occupied Europe by trusted nationals of the occupied countries.

Army Talks 1943 12 15
Army Talks 1943 12 15
Vol. 1 No. 12 ....... Problems of Organized Peace ....... Crane Brinton, the author of this issue of ARMY TALKS, was born in Winstead, Conn., and educated at Harvard and, as a Rhodes scholar, at Oxford University. He has gained an important place among American historians through a series of books on English, French and American history and historical subjects. At present he is in Great Britain.

Army Talks 1943 12 22
Army Talks 1943 12 22
Vol. 1 No. 13 ....... The Soldier and His Mail ..... This issue of ARMY TALKS was written by S/Sgt. Hamilton Whitman, of the ARMY TALKS staff, in co-operation with the Office of the Theater Censor, the Army Postal Service and individual officers and men of all ranks. A newspaperman in civil life, he served as an Associated Press foreign correspondent in Rome, and in Paris, before enlisting in the Army a little less than two years ago.

Army Talks 1944 01 05
Army Talks 1944 01 05
Vol. II No. 1 ....... The British Political System ....... The best soldier is a soldier who knows what he is fighting for, and loves that which he knows. Confidence in command, pride in service, and a deep sense of personal participation and responsibility for the successful conclusion of this war are necessary for victory over the enemy. The German soldier has these qualities. The Tommy and the Yank have these qualities, too, and with much better reasons. Let's look at the reasons why the British soldier in the Eighth Army believes that his Government and political system is worth more than life itself. Denis W. Brogan is the author of this issue of ARMY TALKS.

Army Talks 1944 01 12
Army Talks 1944 01 12
Vol. II No. 2 ....... Two Years of War ....... This issue of ARMY TALKS is composed of extracts from the Biennial Report of the Chief of Staff of the United States Army, July 1, 1941, to June 30, 1943, to the Secretary of War. Published by the Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., it was later reprinted in England by His Majesty's Stationery Office and is available to all service personnel and civilians. ....... GENERAL REVIEW : Reviewing briefly the military situation as we found it on July 1, 1943, it will be remembered that our entry into war was marked by a succession of serious reverses, at Pearl Harbor, in the Philippines and through the Malaysian Archipelago. With our Pacific Fleet crippled and the Philippines overwhelmed at the outset, we were forced to watch the enemy progressively engulf our resistance to his advances. One year before the German offensive in Russia was sweeping through the Donetz Basin, jeopardizing the whole of south Russia and the Caucasus, and ominously menacing the Allied positions in the Middle East, particularly the oil supply at Abadan, on which the naval forces in the eastern Mediterranean, the Indian Ocean and Australia depended. Rommel's Afrika Korps with selected Italian troops had the British with their backs to Cairo, threatening the lifeline of the British Empire. Our successes in the Coral Sea and at Midway and the repulse of the Japanese forces in the Aleutians had not prevented the Japanese from carving out a vast empire from which they threatened India, Australia and our position in the Pacific. Just a year before also the ability of the United States to transport its power in supplies, munitions and troops across the Atlantic was being challenged by submarines, which in a single month had sunk 700,000 gross tons of shipping. ..... July 1, 1943, found the United States Army and Navy united in purpose and in operation, a unity shared when the occasion demands by the British Commonwealth of Nations, the Chinese, Dutch, French and other fighting elements among our friends and supporters. Across the Atlantic the enemy had been driven from North Africa, and Europe had been encircled by a constantly growing military power. The Russian Army, engaging two-thirds of the German ground forces and one-third of the German air fleet in deadly and exhausting combat, had dispelled the legend of the invincibility of the German Panzer divisions.

Army Talks 1944 01 19
Army Talks 1944 01 19
Vol. II No. 3 ....... U.S. Foreign Policy ....... This issue of ARMY TALKS presents excerpts from the recent book of Walter Lippmann, " U.S. Foreign Policy." It was prepared by the ARMY TALKS section through the courtesy and assistance of the London editorial staff of Readers' Digest. ..... Printed in London

Army Talks 1944 01 26
Army Talks 1944 01 26
Vol. II No. 4 ....... Two Nations - One Army ....... Capt. Cyril Falls, author of this issue of ARMY TALKS, served as an officer of the British Army during the last war and is now a military historian and critic on the staff of "The Times," of London. In addition to his articles in the paper, Capt. Falls is the author of several books on military matters and is a lecturer on military and allied subjects.

Army Talks 1944 02 02
Army Talks 1944 02 02
Vol. II No. 5 ....... The Good General ....... This issue of ARMY TALKS was condensed from the book " Generals and Generalship," by Field Marshal Lord Wavell, formerly commander of British Forces in the Middle East, Commander-in-Chief in India and now Viceroy of India. It is reproduced by special permission of the Wavell family, and was prepared by the ARMY TALKS section for American troops in the European Theater of Operations.

Army Talks 1944 02 09
Army Talks 1944 02 09
Vol. II No. 6 ....... Jobs After the War ....... In this issue of ARMY TALKS Charles Hitch, a well-known young economist, has sketched the nature of the problem and suggested some of the general lines along which many of those expert in such matters would move in seeking a solution. The purpose of this issue, however is not to advocate any particular remedy but to stimulate discussion of the nature of the problem and the application of constructive intelligence to its solution.

Army Talks 1944 02 16
Army Talks 1944 02 16
Vol. II No. 7 ....... Soldier Savings ....... THIS issue of ARMY TALKS is devoted to the numerous ways by which a soldier in the ETO may, and should, save the major part of his pay each month. The full force of Allied operations against the Nazis and Japanese will soon be felt. The billions of dollars that the United States must spend for all types of war material will make these operations possible and successful We should know where this money comes from and how each of us, regardless of grade or rank, carries his responsibilities of citizenship from home to his present location. Material for Soldier Savings was initially prepared in the Office of the Theater Bond Officer from official circulars and directives, and from an article by Harry Scherman, entitled "Invisible Greenbacks," which appeared in the "Saturday Evening Post" in 1942. The material has been adapted for publication by the ARMY TALKS Section.

Army Talks 1944 02 23
Army Talks 1944 02 23
Vol. II No. 8 ....... France ....... This issue of ARMY TALKS has been carefully prepared in an effort to bring the truth of the present crisis of France before you and to give you a sufficient record of the past so that you will be competent to form a just and a fair opinion. It is urged that the discussion leader read the copy with the greatest care, and that he give out as much of the information contained in it as his speaking time permits. Crane Brinton of the American Office of Strategic Services, London, and Lt. Richard Oliphant, USN, are co-authors of this ARMY TALKS article on France.

Army Talks 1944 03 01
Army Talks 1944 03 01
Vol. II No. 9 ....... The German Soldier ....... This issue of ARMY TALKS was prepared by S/Sgt. H. Whitman of the staff of ARMY TALKS, based upon material from U.S. Army files, the British Ministry of Information and the British War Office. The data on the psychological training of German troops was first published in New York by the American Committee for National Morals in 1941 as a part of a report entitled " German Psychological Warfare." ..... SUMMARY : The German soldier is tough, well-trained and well equipped. He has had such a thorough psychological training that even when he is routed in battle, captured, transported thousands of miles and landed in a barbed-wire " bullpen," he still believes the men he left behind are winning this war. He can be beaten but only by men who are tougher, more able and better trained than he is. ..... Printed in London

Army Talks 1944 03 08
Army Talks 1944 03 08
Vol. II No. 10 ....... Words are Weapons, too! ....... SOLDIERS who do their fighting with a rifle and bayonet, a long-range bomber or the machine tools of an Ordnance or Engineer workshop, are very likely to have a low opinion of the highly-trained specialists of the Psychological Warfare Combat Teams. A FOOTSORE DOGFACE, staggering in under a full field pack from 20 miles in the British rain, could be pardoned for doubting the combat efficiency of a chair-borne sergeant from the psycho crew. GERMAN MACHINE GUNNERS, coming through the lines in Africa and Italy to surrender, would change his mind, if he saw them. In this ARMY TALKS article, Sergeant Dugan explains how the men with typewriters help the men with Tommy guns - how we're all part of the same big team on the winning side in the biggest series of all. ....... Sgt. James Dugan, author of this issue of ARMY TALKS, is a former New York newspaperman now assigned to duty with the American Office of War Information, ETO. In the preparation of this article, Sgt. Dugan drew upon the resources of the civilian military organization in the hands of whose members words are weapons and ideas are as devastating as blockbusters. ..... Printed in London

Army Talks 1944 03 15
Army Talks 1944 03 15
Vol. II No. 11 ....... The Yank in Britain ....... This issue of ARMY TALKS was written by an American scientist, Margaret Mead, primarily for the British Army Bureau of Current Affairs. In order to introduce Americans to British soldiers, it has just been published by ABCA, British equivalent of ARMY TALKS. This is what the British Army is being told about Americans in the American Army. In explaining Americans to Britons, it also serves to explain Britons to Americans.

Army Talks 1944 03 22
Army Talks 1944 03 22
Vol. II No. 12 ....... An Army is Quite a Thing ....... This issue of ARMY TALKS is based on an excerpt from the notable book, " The Battle is the Pay-off," by Major Ralph Ingersoll. The author, a noted New York journalist and editor, enlisted in the first World War at the age of 17 and enlisted again in the present conflict. He took part in the Tunisian campaign as a captain in the Engineers.

Army Talks 1944 03 29
Army Talks 1944 03 29
Vol. II No. 13 ....... Lend-Lease - Weapon for Victory ....... This issue of ARMY TALKS consists of an excerpt from the book, Lend-Lease, Weapon For Victory, by Edward R. Stettinius, Jr., first Lend-Lease administrator and now Undersecretary of State in Washington. It describes how the United States realized that danger threatened, and of the steps which were taken both before and after Pearl Harbor.

Army Talks 1944 04 05
Army Talks 1944 04 05
Vol. II No. 14 ....... The Nature of a Free Man ....... We Americans weren't the only backward citizens. The rest of the free peoples in the Western world were just as dull. They have paid a more terrible price. They lived higher on the slopes of the volcano; they were the first to perish under the rain of fire. But did we pay heed, we who lived only a little lower on those same slopes? We said, "It's rather warm, isn't it?" We said, " The air seems a trifle dusty." And we said, "It will surely blow over." One by one, ten nations on the continent of Europe were killed. In Asia the Chinese were ravaged by the Japs. In the whole world there was only the British Empire between us and the barbarian. And still we told ourselves that we were safe, that we were at peace, that if we kept quiet nothing bad would happen. We were like grown-up children, playing at housekeeping, forgetting that we were middle-aged, that our parents had died years ago, and that if we were to have a house to keep we must earn it in a harsh world and hold it by our daily labor. The hardest task is to be free men. We were behaving as if it were the easiest task, as if freedom came to us by divine right. If England had fallen in 1940, America would not have been able to face the Axis alone. We were unprepared. Our conduct between the two wars was folly. We took freedom for granted. Herbert Agar is the author of this issue of ARMY TALKS.

Army Talks 1944 04 12
Army Talks 1944 04 12
Vol. II No. 15 ....... Teamwork ....... This issue of ARMY TALKS deals with the necessity for teamwork in the army, particularly in the type of warfare being waged today, and with its impact on the individual soldier. It was written by enlisted men on the staff of ARMY TALKS on the basis of suggestions made by the Chief of Special Service. ..... Printed in London

Army Talks 1944 04 19
Army Talks 1944 04 19
Vol. II No. 16 ....... Brains, Guts and Concrete ....... This issue of ARMY TALKS deals with German fortifications and the methods which will be used in blasting a path through them. It was prepared by a member of the ARMY TALKS staff, who gathered first-hand material in a week at an Assault Training Center in the ETO and from an account of the Todt Organisation printed by the Infantry Journal.

Army Talks 1944 04 26
Army Talks 1944 04 26
Vol. II No. 17 ....... Queen of Battle ....... This issue of ARMY TALKS is a tribute to the fighting foot soldier. It was written to show that he still plays first fiddle in the aggregation that shortly will provide music for Hitler's Swan Song. How he trains and what he must know ; his weapons and equipment ; how he operates in modern battle - these are the things about the Infantryman that all soldiers should know.

Army Talks 1944 05 03
Army Talks 1944 05 03
Vol. II No. 18 ....... The Enemy and You ....... This issue of ARMY TALKS dicusses your enemy - the Nazi soldier you will face when the Allies invade Europe. It deals with his background, training, equipment and skill as a fighter. The first section of the book, explaining the background of Hitler's army, was based on material assembled by ARMY TALKS staff. The last part giving detailed facts about the German soldier, was taken from "The German Soldier" and published by the Infantry Journal in February 1944.

Army Talks 1944 05 10
Army Talks 1944 05 10
Vol. II No. 19 ....... These Guys fought 'em! ....... Fanatical and furious fighters, filled with Hitler hysteria, a far-from-beaten German army stands guarding the slave continent of Europewaiting for the Allies to invade. ... Tough as they are in combat, however, Jerry soldiers have been forced to bow before the might of Allied assaults. They can be killed just like anybody else. Thousands of them have been taken prisoner. ... This issue of ARMY TALKS was written by an American officer who visited one of the veteran divisions of the United States Army and talked to men who had been all through the Tunisian and Sicilian campaigns. They described how Jerry fights, what makes him dangerous and what makes him weak, and told how he acts when he is captured. ... Compiled and edited, the quotations from these veteran Yanks give the composite picture of what you'll meet across the Channel.

Army Talks 1944 05 17
Army Talks 1944 05 17
Vol. II No. 20 ....... "Mein Kampf" by Adolf Hitler ....... In this week's issue of ARMY TALKS Adolf Hitler, alias Adolf Schickelgruber, takes the stand. This "testimony" was given while in jail 20 years ago. You in a sense are the jury which will give the verdict. The vicious deeds of the last decade prove that he meant what he said in Mein Kampf, What is your judgment on the ideas and the deeds that have come from them? This issue is a 'natural' from the discussion point of view.

Army Talks 1944 05 31
Army Talks 1944 05 31
Vol. II No. 22 ....... ACHTUNG!! atten'SHUN TO YOU ....... The dope in this ARMY TALKS was written by Major Roy L. Atteberry and illustrated by Sergeant Dick Wingert. It's combat stuff right out of a combat soldier's mouth. The ideas in it aren't written like a Field Manual, but you'll find they parallel your training pretty nearly all the way. If you have learned it a little differently, do it the way your outfit has been taught. But, to repeat, you'll find that combat experience proves that your training is just about the best in the world. Similar booklets proved mighty useful to troops about to go into action in other theatres of war. ARMY TALKS therefore brings these combat hints to American soldiers in the European Theater of Operations.

Army Talks 1944 06 07
Army Talks 1944 06 07
Vol. II No. 23 ....... Greetings from Goebbels ....... You know how the Nazis used psychological warfare before 1930 to secure " bloodless " conquests in the Rhineland, Austria and Czechoslovakia. Hitler's propaganda machine is still a most effective weapon. Nazi agents can plant rumors and disunity stories in any townperhaps they've been active in the town near your airfield, depot or camp. Propaganda attack is used not only against the men in the fox holes, where German loud speakers bray Goebbels' message and planes and shells scatter his leaflets, but can be focused on ground crews in East Anglia or stevedores in a west coast port. Nazi hooey, clever though it is, can't stand up to the facts. Soldiers, everywhere, must be prepared and inoculated against the Goebbels germ just as they are against an attack of typhus. Both can destroy military efficiency.

Army Talks 1944 06 14
Army Talks 1944 06 14
Vol. II No. 24 ....... France Underground ....... NOTE : TO GROUND FORCE UNIT LEADERS : The subject of this issue explains itself to the Army Ground Forces. Your men may be in contact and receiving aid from members of the underground in the near future. The more you know about it, the more help it will give you. ..... NOTE : TO AIR FORCE UNIT LEADERS : Men in the Air Force already know the French and how they are working with us. Returned fliers who have " baled out " can speak from experience. Remember that the French have not maintained resentment for our bombing of their countryside and cities wherever it struck at the enemy. Remember, too, that many of them have been killed before they would " rat " on us. ..... NOTE : TO SOS UNIT LEADERS : No people understand the problem of supply any better than the French guerillas. Part of their business is to destroy the enemy's supply depots, dumps and lines. Part of your business in France will be to establish dumps and lines, but you will be servicing them with the canny help of the Frenchman - not trying to protect them against him. At this minute the Germans are fighting against double odds to keep their supplies intact and mobile. At this minute we and the French are smashing their supplies with everything we've got. ..... Printed in London

Army Talks 1944 06 21
Army Talks 1944 06 21
Vol. II No. 25 ....... See yourself as Jerry sees you! ....... We know what we are broadcasting to the Germans about the war it is the truth, just as we are telling it to our own people. We know, too, what the Germans are broadcasting. This issue of ARMY TALKS carries releases of what the Nazi machine is handing out to Germany and the occupied countries by press and radio. Some of it is fairly clever ; most of it is distorted and exaggerated out of all relation to the truth. To us it may sound silly. But to the fellow who doesn't know anything about us it can prove an efficient and devilish weapon.

Army Talks 1944 06 28
Army Talks 1944 06 28
Vol. II No. 26 ....... Who's who, what's what, and Hau's hofer ....... Material for this issue was prepared by the staff of ARMY TALKS from the book " Geopolitics" by Robert Strausz-Hupe, an article in " Fortune" by the same author, and from numerous articles and reports made available through the courtesy of the Royal Institute of International Affairs, Chatham House, London.

Army Talks 1944 07 05
Army Talks 1944 07 05
Vol. II No. 27 ....... Notes from Normandy ....... Material for this issue was secured in the combat area in Normandy by a member of ARMY TALKS staff, and sent back by 'plane. It is written by the soldiers fighting in France. What you've been taught at Fort Benning and Camp Blanding and Fort Ord, or wherever you did your training, is paying off in Normandy today. Our men are pushing and pushing the Jerry can't cope with what we have. But the terrain is new, it's not Georgia or Florida or California. It isn't Tunisia, Sicily or Italy. It's a new kind of country - and a new kind of war, The only old thing about it is the enemy and even he is up to new tricks. Here are some of the lessons we're learning in Normandy, They come from ihe officers, non-coms, and enlisted men that are fighting there. To get them ARMY TALKS went right to the front lines, to the hospitals, the supply dumps, the CPs and the fox holes. They're not to be taken as gospel and doctrine. They're nothing more nor less than what men and officers already in combat say. These are the comments of some after they have met up wiih the Germans.

Army Talks 1944 07 12
Army Talks 1944 07 12
Vol. II No. 28 ....... That Question is Here Again! ....... That Question is Here Again : What are we fighting for? Perhaps Harold Nicholson has struck it when he said " a world without conceit or cruelty, without greed and lies." In other words we are fighting primarily to rid the world of the German menace, and then to set up a decent reasonable world order, with sufficient statesmanship and vision to prevent the repetition of another world disaster. The obvious answer to this question is that we are fighting now in Europe and the Pacific because if we don't the Germans and Japanese will eventually invade the U.S. and we would rather fight them where they are than in our own streets. That is an obvious and rather selfish answer. It disregards one bulwark of the truth - the character of the American people. In a recent editorial a prominent American newspaper made these observations: " All races, all colors, make us up, and when wars like the present one engulf us, all races and all colors take up arms for America. When we strike back at our enemies, the American kin of those enemies do the striking, Americans of Italian extraction, of German extraction, even of Japanese extraction. We are of almost every extraction conceivable, black, white and yellow and red, and so we are tied together not by any mystical philosophy of blood or common ethnic traits, but solely and simply by an idea the idea of democracy, of individual freedom, of liberty under law, of a justice before which all of us stand equal.

Army Talks 1944 07 19
Army Talks 1944 07 19
Vol. II No. 29 ....... Air Power ....... In a previous issue of ARMY TALKS (Vol. I, No. 8) air power was discussed in the light of the situation as it then existed. Since that time the Army Air Forces have plastered Germany, France and the Low Countries in the process of preparing Normandy for the landings of'June 6. The whole strategic and tactical picture of the war has changed. The tempo of bombing has been in high gear for the past months, and air power has engaged increasingly in the attack on fortress Europe. ... This issue of ARMY TALKS was prepared by Captain Eric Friedheim of the United States Strategic Air Forces in Europe. Captain Friedheim was formerly Aviation Editor of International News Service and a member of the Aviation Writers' Association.

Army Talks 1944 07 26
Army Talks 1944 07 26
Vol. II No. 30 ....... Seven Against The World! ....... This issue of ARMY TALKS deals with certain men high in the ranks of the Nazi party, and with the part they are playing in this war. It is just one of a series of ARMY TALKS which have appeared in the past several months, dealing with the German enemy. Mingled with such Talks arc others - Notes from Normandy for instance - which bring the combat experience of troops in France to the attention of every soldier in this Theater. Another recent issue was Achtung, which was distributed to the men in the landing craft just before they hit the shores of France on D-Day. Achtung, along with the other ARMY TALKS, explained to the soldier his mission, gave him pertinent information to help him in his task, and sent him into battle better informed about the immediate fight before him, as well as the broader background of the war. General Eisenhower is determined that the American soldier in this Theater be a well informed soldier. An extract from his letter of 30 April, 1944, appears on the opposite page. To supplement the hour a week of training time allotted to ARMY TALKS, a simple, coordinated program has been, devised. The ARMY TALKS pamphlet is distributed on a basis of 3 per company to your command. Every Thursday in the Warweek supplement of Stars and Stripes the soidiers familiarized on the current week's ARMY TALKS, so that he may enter into the discussion with some knowledge of the subject. ..... Printed in London

Army Talks 1944 08 09
Army Talks 1944 08 09
Vol. II No. 32 ....... What You Should Know About France ....... The present issue of ARMY TALKS is written for all of us by one of us. Our roving reporter spent three weeks in Normandy just after D-Day and renewed his acquaintance with a country and people he had visited before. He saw the places, the problems and the people that all of us want to get near to and he put down on paper as many answers as he could.

Army Talks 1944 08 16
Army Talks 1944 08 16
Vol. II No. 33 ....... Alexei Kulikov, Red Army Man ....... This is the story of a GI in the Red Army. In it, you see what a Russian soldier thinks and feels, and you understand better his success in killing Germans. Kulikov is not unlike an American GI. He loves his country and wants to go home. He is hungry for news of the home front. He is afraid, but he overcomes his fear and tolerates everything in his fellow soldiers except cowardice in the face of the enemy. He develops skill in scouting, shooting, killing. He senses the importance of the team and knows the joy a soldier feels as his artillery and airforce join with him in battle. Gradually his outlook broadens and he realizes the world-wide scope of the war. He appreciates his Allies and learns about his enemies. And what he learns about Germans adds fuel to his burning hate. This ARMY TALKS is from a story by Boris Gorbatov, a Red Soldier.

Army Talks 1944 08 23
Army Talks 1944 08 23
Vol. II No. 34 ....... Picture Paradise ....... This week's ARMY TALK concerns failure of Germany's effort to recruit French labor for German war plants by a flamboyant advertising campaign, setting up the joys and rewards for such an effort. A similar campaign directed toward the Germans would have succeeded. For the German is used to being told, not to thinking.

Army Talks 1944 08 30
Army Talks 1944 08 30
Vol. II No. 35 ....... What Boche PWs Think About You .......

Army Talks 1944 09 06
Army Talks 1944 09 06
Vol. II No. 36 ....... How I Got Wounded ....... An examination of the " case studies " in this issue reveals that many of them made the same mistakes. Careful surveys of combat casualties indicate that most men get hit because they neglect some simple combat precaution. Copy the list of rules on pages 12-13, obey them in the field and STAY HEALTHY.

Army Talks 1944 09 13
Army Talks 1944 09 13
Vol. II No. 37 ....... Combat Medicine ....... This article has been written by an ARMY TALKS staff writer. The material was gathered from official Medical Corps sources, hospital authorities and the casualties themselves. It is straight, matter-of-fact reporting on what the Medical Corps is doing to make sure that you get the breaks. It's important it's your life!

Army Talks 1944 09 27
Army Talks 1944 09 27
Vol. II No. 39 ....... You're Really in the Army Now ....... The material in this issue was prepared by a Private - a Replacement. It was written to help Replacements get their bearings. Because the information can be useful not only to green troops, but as a review and refresher for veterans, it is being published in ARMY TALKS. ..... What German Prisoners Say About You ..... Battle Tips

Army Talks 1944 10 21
Army Talks 1944 10 21
Vol. II No. 40 ....... What to do With Germany! ....... This issue of ARMY TALKS, written by a soldier who served in the last war as well as in this, brings back the attitudes and the errors of a quarter of a century ago. History is often made by men who have learned very little from history. Nobody is in a stronger position, nobody has more at stake in this war than those men who have fought in it. If we fail ro stop and reflect and try to answer the repeated "What do you think?" of this ARMY TALKS, we may be guilty of fighting without knowing why. ..... First Issue Printed in Paris

Army Talks 1944 11 04
Army Talks 1944 11 04
Vol. II No. 41 ....... Jap - German German - Jap ....... Twice in our own lifetime the German people have deliberately plunged the world into war. They had their eyes open; they knew what they were doing. In 1914 their slogan was German Kulturwhich you can translate as a world run by and for Germans. In 1939 it was Weltanschauung, same translation. The people themselves were responsible. Without their consent, their sacrifices, their money; without their active support, their will to conquer, neither war would have been possible. The carnage, the blood, the destruction and terror and havoc, all the filthy mess of modern war is their responsibilityand theirs alone. A Christian heartprompted by some "organized sympathy" (organized in Germany) might forgive the first transgression. What on earth could possess a people that they should try it twice? ..... Printed in London

Army Talks 1944 11 04A
Army Talks 1944 11 04A
Vol. II No. 42 ....... China - Seven Years at War ....... We happen to be fighting in the ETO. But for the "luck of the draw" any one of us in Europe might be fighting 10,000 or 15,000 miles from here, under MacArthur, or Mountbatten, or Stilwell, or Chennault, instead of under Eisenhower or Alexander. out buddies are there. That's our war, too. What happens on one side of the world is of personal and intense importance to the other side of the world. Chinese victories (and even tactical defeats) are saving American lives. A Chinese may save your life, or mine. Without question, victories in Asia will permit us to get home sooner. Victory over Germany, in Europe, will shorten the languish of war for the Chinese. Successful operations, in the Asiatic theater, against Japan, will shorten the war for Europeans and Americans. Reducing the length of the war anywhere, by months, days or even hours will save many, many Allied lives. ..... Printed in Paris

Army Talks 1944 11 11
Army Talks 1944 11 11
Vol. II No. 43 ....... What To Do With War Criminals? ....... WILL THE GUILTY ESCAPE THIS TIME? Judgment Day for German war criminals is very close. Many, many thousands already feel the hand of Fate clutching at their necks. Some may be fortunate and die in battle. Others skulk in terror of those whom they once terrorized. Cessation of hostilities, surrender, will not mean safety or that they may escape punishment. Last time war criminals went scot-free. This time they will be punished. What then is the difference which enables such a positive statement to be made. There is all the difference in the world between World War I and this war. Consider these eight points: ... 1. The planned enormities of the crimes ... 2. The nature of the evidence ... 3. The number of accusing nations ... 4. Statements of official policy ... 5. No refuge in neutral nations ... 6. This time all Germany is likely to be occupied ... 7. Lessons were learned last time with profit ... 8. Changing public opinion outside Germany ..... Printed in Paris

Army Talks 1944 11 18
Army Talks 1944 11 18
Vol. II No. 43 ....... What To Do With War Criminals? ....... WILL THE GUILTY ESCAPE THIS TIME? Judgment Day for German war criminals is very close. Many, many thousands already feel the hand of Fate clutching at their necks. Some may be fortunate and die in battle. Others skulk in terror of those whom they once terrorized. Cessation of hostilities, surrender, will not mean safety or that they may escape punishment. Last time war criminals went scot-free. This time they will be punished. What then is the difference which enables such a positive statement to be made. There is all the difference in the world between World War I and this war. Consider these eight points: ... 1. The planned enormities of the crimes ... 2. The nature of the evidence ... 3. The number of accusing nations ... 4. Statements of official policy ... 5. No refuge in neutral nations ... 6. This time all Germany is likely to be occupied ... 7. Lessons were learned last time with profit ... 8. Changing public opinion outside Germany ..... Printed in London

Army Talks 1944 11 18A
Army Talks 1944 11 18A
Vol. II No. 44 ....... German "Supermen" Return Underground ....... Germans Continue To Plan World Conquest ... We, Americans and Allies, think of this struggle as separate wars, with intervals of uneasy peace. The minds of German leaders their followers do not work that way. They think of World War I and World War II and Wars III and IV and V, if necessary to attain Germany's desire domination of the world as parts of one continuing fight for that world domination. Already this has been to them another Thirty Years War. It is not ended. To them it may take another Hundred Years War but "Germany has a glorious future and she will attain it!" To us, it is clear we must face hard facts. Evidence to prove the differing German point of view has been rapidly accumulating for more than a year and on certain phases for at least eighty years. The latest evidence, recently given official backing, asserts most solemnly that: The Germans, both General Staff planners and Nazi gangster leaders, are going underground. They plan, with an improved version of what they did from 1929 to 1939, to sabotage our military victory. Can they get away with it? ..... Printed in Paris

Army Talks 1944 11 25
Army Talks 1944 11 25
Vol. II No. 45 ....... Blueprint for World War III ....... What does the German soldier think about the war now? Since D-Day he has really been taking it. He's groggy. He's down. But is he out? Is he ashamed of his part in the grab that Hitler tried to get away with? Is he ready to admit that crime doesn't pay? Is he prepared to be - a Dagwood the rest of his life instead of a Superman? ARMY TALKS sent a reporter out to visit a German PW camp. He talked to the prisoners there in a quiet, green meadow beside the river ... asked them what they thought about the end of the : war ... about their future and the future of Germany. A stenographer wrote down the conversations word for word. ..... Printed in Paris

Army Talks 1944 12 02
Army Talks 1944 12 02
Vol. II No. 46 ....... VD ....... VD cases and prevention systems both German and American ..... Whats the Score on Prisoners of War Camps? . ..... Printed in Paris

Army Talks 1944 12 09A
Army Talks 1944 12 09A
Vol. II No. 47 ....... Teamwork for Peace ....... This ARMY TALKS discusses what has recently happened at a conference at Dumbarton Oaks. Another reason is that, even if you did read something about this conference of the Big Four, its meaning may not be obvious unless there is also a clear understanding of other things which have been going on. Dumbarton Oaks is a country house just outside Washington, where representatives of the United States, Great Britain, the Soviet Union and China have been meeting for about six weeks, trying to find the best way to prevent World War III and all wars in the future. ..... Printed in Paris

Army Talks 1944 12 16
Army Talks 1944 12 16
Vol. II No. 47 ....... Teamwork for Peace ....... This ARMY TALKS discusses what has recently happened at a conference at Dumbarton Oaks. Another reason is that, even if you did read something about this conference of the Big Four, its meaning may not be obvious unless there is also a clear understanding of other things which have been going on. Dumbarton Oaks is a country house just outside Washington, where representatives of the United States, Great Britain, the Soviet Union and China have been meeting for about six weeks, trying to find the best way to prevent World War III and all wars in the future. ..... Printed in London

Army Talks 1944 12 16A
Army Talks 1944 12 16A
Vol. II No. 48 ....... Jabo - The Story of Air-Ground Teamwork ....... To Germans in the ranks, as well as on the highest command levels, FIGHTER-BOMBERS are one of the most terrifying Allied weapons on the western front. When asked what weapon they fear most, German prisoners usually reply: "Jagd-bombers" or simply "Jabo", the long and short for fighter-bombers. ... What Price Feet? - Trench Foot ... Newsscope ..... Printed in Paris

Army Talks 1944 12 23A
Army Talks 1944 12 23A
Vol. II No. 49 ....... Who Made Hitler? ....... Photographs reproduced in this issue provide pictorial answer to the question. They show, from page 3 on, typical Germans men, women and children who "heiled" Hitler to power, and kept him in power. These are official German pictures, published in documentary books, and captured by the Allies when Paris was liberated. For the story of the pictures, and of their capture, turn the page. ..... Printed in Paris

Army Talks 1944 12 30
Army Talks 1944 12 30
Vol. II No. 50 ....... Tactical Air Power ....... To All Members 0f The Ninth Air Force: This is the first special Ninth Air Force issue of ARMY TALKS. It is essential that as soldiers we keep ourselves Informed of the actions of the enemy and of the progress of this war. It is essential that as citizens of a great representative democracy we understand the conditions and problems of tho world in which we live. - Hoyt S. Vandenberg Major General, US Army Commanding ..... Contents: Tactical Air Power : Phase I - Destruction of Enemy Air Arm ..... Phase II - Interception of Enemy Supplies ..... Phase III - Support of Ground Troops

Army Talks 1944 12 30A
Army Talks 1944 12 30A
Vol. II No. 50 ....... The Combat Man Speaks ....... When the Army finds an opinion based on lack of information, it tries to present the facts. If the opinion is a sound judgment of a bad situation, it attempts to change the situation. Naturally this is not always possible. The Army is one family whose children can expect to "take it", as well as to receive consideration. Recently 35 men in different veteran combat outfits were asked a barrage of nine questions. These men. were selected from units which had found the going ultra-rough. The replies, stripped of certain Army adjectives, appear in this ARMY TALKS. Because of their small number, these represent only individual opinion and not what all soldiers think or even what their own outfits believe. ... Newsscope ..... Printed in Paris

Army Talks 1944 12 30B
Army Talks 1944 12 30B
Vol. II No. 49 ....... Who Made Hitler? ....... Photographs reproduced in this issue provide pictorial answer to the question. They show, from page 3 on, typical Germans men, women and children who "heiled" Hitler to power, and kept him in power. These are official German pictures, published in documentary books, and captured by the Allies when Paris was liberated. For the story of the pictures, and of their capture, turn the page. ..... Printed in London

Army Talks 1945 01 06
Army Talks 1945 01 06
Vol. III No. 1 ....... The Army in Europe by Walter Lippmann Also: Why Unconditional Surrender? by Allan Michie ....... Approximately every twelfth letter from ARMY TALKS' readers winds up: "Why doesn't somebody tell it to the people back home?" ARMY TALKS is a Restricted publication, which means that it neither can be quoted in the civilian press nor sent to other than military personnel. But the story is getting back. Walter Lippmann, author of U.S. FOREIGN POLICY and widely syndicated columnist, recently returned to the United States from a visit that covered the European battlefronts. ARMY TALKS has the privilege of publishing his report to the US ... a remarkably clear picture of the accomplishment of the armies from in June to mid-December, and of the problems that face General Eisenhower in the follow through to final victory. ....... The defeat of Germany is certain. Even the Germans know it all except a hard core of fanatical Nazis. Then, why do the German leaders carry on the fight ? The answer can be summed up in two words: ANOTHER CHANCE! Another chance to build a strong Germany, to set up a powerful war machine to conquer the world. HOW DO THEY THINK THEY CAN WIN THAT CHANCE? 1. By fighting until we get tired of the fight. ... 2. By fighting so that they can retire {from the field "with honor" and a German Army intact. ... 3. By making complete victory so expensive that we will agree to a negotiated peace which would give Germany something to build on for the next try. ... 4. By holding out until propaganda might undermine the Allies' unity of purpose. The Nazis hope to "divide and conquer" us even in defeat. ... 5. As a last resort, to carry on until there is a "break" in the German home front. They would then have a basis for another myth that "the German Army was never defeated." What is meant by " unconditional surrender? What does it mean in demands to be made on the Germans... in jobs that have to be done by Allied armies... pitfalls to be avoided during the months that follow the German collapse? Allan Michie's article, "Why Unconditional Surrender?" explains these questions and shows what is involved. ..... Printed in Paris

Army Talks 1945 01 13
Army Talks 1945 01 13
Vol. III No. 1 ....... The Army in Europe by Walter Lippmann Also: Why Unconditional Surrender? by Allan Michie ....... Approximately every twelfth letter from ARMY TALKS' readers winds up: "Why doesn't somebody tell it to the people back home?" ARMY TALKS is a Restricted publication, which means that it neither can be quoted in the civilian press nor sent to other than military personnel. But the story is getting back. Walter Lippmann, author of U.S. FOREIGN POLICY and widely syndicated columnist, recently returned to the United States from a visit that covered the European battlefronts. ARMY TALKS has the privilege of publishing his report to the US ... a remarkably clear picture of the accomplishment of the armies from in June to mid-December, and of the problems that face General Eisenhower in the follow through to final victory. ....... The defeat of Germany is certain. Even the Germans know it all except a hard core of fanatical Nazis. Then, why do the German leaders carry on the fight ? The answer can be summed up in two words: ANOTHER CHANCE! Another chance to build a strong Germany, to set up a powerful war machine to conquer the world. HOW DO THEY THINK THEY CAN WIN THAT CHANCE? 1. By fighting until we get tired of the fight. ... 2. By fighting so that they can retire {from the field "with honor" and a German Army intact. ... 3. By making complete victory so expensive that we will agree to a negotiated peace which would give Germany something to build on for the next try. ... 4. By holding out until propaganda might undermine the Allies' unity of purpose. The Nazis hope to "divide and conquer" us even in defeat. ... 5. As a last resort, to carry on until there is a "break" in the German home front. They would then have a basis for another myth that "the German Army was never defeated." What is meant by " unconditional surrender? What does it mean in demands to be made on the Germans... in jobs that have to be done by Allied armies... pitfalls to be avoided during the months that follow the German collapse? Allan Michie's article, "Why Unconditional Surrender?" explains these questions and shows what is involved. ..... Printed in London

Army Talks 1945 01 13A
Army Talks 1945 01 13A
Vol. III No. 2 ....... 7 New Year's Days ....... It is the custom on New Year's Day to look retrospectively on events and to make resolutions for the new year. In this issue, Army Talks imagines itself on seven New Year's Days, looking back over the year that has just ended, summarizing the events. Such a review makes a concise history of World War II. From his own memory, each can contribute the supplement to these accounts; each can fill in the date when the war began for him, when he reached the United Kingdom and France, and all those other important events which may be more real than the war itself. And each may resolve, at the start of 1945, that the Allied Nations will conclude the German war this year and bring peace again to the world. ..... Printed in France

Army Talks 1945 01 20
Army Talks 1945 01 20
Vol. III No. 3 ....... USSR ... How To Blunt A Blitzkrieg ....... This issue covers the story of the Soviet Union from the early days of 1939 to present. The tactics employed, the support recieved and the makeup of the Russian Army are also covered. ..... Newscope - "We Have Returned" ( Philippines ) ..... Printed in France

Army Talks 1945 01 20A
Army Talks 1945 01 20A
Vol. III No. 2 ....... It is the custom on New Year's Day to look retrospectively on events and to make resolutions for the new year. In this issue, Army Talks imagines itself on seven New Year's Days, looking back over the year that has just ended, summarizing the events. Such a review makes a concise history of World War II. From his own memory, each can contribute the supplement to these accounts; each can fill in the date when the war began for him, when he reached the United Kingdom and France, and all those other important events which may be more real than the war itself. And each may resolve, at the start of 1945, that the Allied Nations will conclude the German war this year and bring peace again to the world. ..... Printed in England

Army Talks 1945 01 27
Army Talks 1945 01 27
Vol. III No. 3 ....... USSR ... How To Blunt A Blitzkrieg ....... This issue covers the story of the Soviet Union from the early days of 1939 to present. The tactics employed, the support recieved and the makeup of the Russian Army are also covered. ..... Newscope - "We Have Returned" ( Philippines ) ..... Printed in England

Army Talks 1945 01 27A
Army Talks 1945 01 27A
Vol. III No. 4 ....... The State of the Union ....... Article II, Section 3 of our Constitution provides that the President "shall from time to time give the Cor gress information on the state of the Union, and recommend to their consideration such measures as he shall judge necessary and expedient." On 6 January the President's report was read to the newly-assembled 79th Congress. That evening the President himself broadcast a condensed version to the American people. In his message the President discussed four main points. Our overall strategy during the past three years. Our past record and present needs. The kind of peace we aim to have. The opportunities and responsibilities we face when the war ends. Each of these subjects has a vital bearing on and interest to every American soldier. The President in his suggestions for new legislation attacked the problems in forthright fashion. STARS AND STRIPES printed a digest of the radio report, but since any digest is incomplete and omits important information, ARMY TALKS presents the complete text of our Commander-in-Chief. ..... Printed in France

Army Talks 1945 02 03
Army Talks 1945 02 03
Vol. III No. 4 ....... The State of the Union ....... Article II, Section 3 of our Constitution provides that the President "shall from time to time give the Cor gress information on the state of the Union, and recommend to their consideration such measures as he shall judge necessary and expedient." On 6 January the President's report was read to the newly-assembled 79th Congress. That evening the President himself broadcast a condensed version to the American people. In his message the President discussed four main points. Our overall strategy during the past three years. Our past record and present needs. The kind of peace we aim to have. The opportunities and responsibilities we face when the war ends. Each of these subjects has a vital bearing on and interest to every American soldier. The President in his suggestions for new legislation attacked the problems in forthright fashion. STARS AND STRIPES printed a digest of the radio report, but since any digest is incomplete and omits important information, ARMY TALKS presents the complete text of our Commander-in-Chief. ..... Printed in England

Army Talks 1945 02 10
Army Talks 1945 02 10
Vol. III No. 5 ....... How to Keep House in a Foxhole ....... To date no way has been found to turn a foxhole into a cozy suite at the Waldorf. You simply can't change a hole in the ground into a subway bungalow. Also, many of the things that are practical in rear areas won't work when you're advancing. On the attack you take cover when and where you can find it, and move on as quickly as you can. It's a race against time; comfort counts for nothing. The tips are collected here in the hope that some of them may be new - and helpful - to men in holding sectors, men who have dug in for more than a few hours, men in rear positions. ..... Preclude to Victory - A 1,500 word condensation of a book by James B. Reston, noted London and Washington correspondent for the New York Times. ..... Newscope ..... Printed in England

Army Talks 1945 02 17
Army Talks 1945 02 17
Vol. III No. 7 ....... We Come As Conquerors ....... This, in the words of General Eisenhower, is our greeting to the people of Germany. Already they know we mean it. There has not been - and there will not be - any coddling of the "master race". "We come as conquerors but not as oppressors." Town by town they are feeling the might of our arms, as the Allied forces cut deeper into the Nazi fortress. But they must feel more than that. They must feel the firm justice that moves in with our armies, and then lingers on to finish the job in the wake of the battle. That is the reason we have G-5, the new branch of the army which goes in with the combat troops and stays on to see that we get what we were fighting for. In France we wanted a free France. There, and in other liberated countries, G-5 operations were known as Civil Affairs. So G-5 in Germany will be Military Government - pure and simple. There'll be rules to follow, and every Allied government now moving into Germany has agreed on them. But they will be rules that give no quarter to the Nazi way of life. ..... The Second Battle for Naples - The Allies fought two battles for Naples last year. They won the first early in October when they routed the Germans and occupied the City. They marked up their second victory in a bloodless offensive against another kind of enemy - an army of lice which carries typhus fever in its ammo belt and mows men down by thousands if given half a chance. We don't hear much about louse-borne typhus in the United States, but the disease flares up in Europe with grim regularity - particularly when war forces whole populations to live more like animals than humans. ..... Newscope - Down, But Not Out ..... Printed in France

Army Talks 1945 02 24
Army Talks 1945 02 24
Vol. III No. 6 ....... Combat Tips - For Fighting in Winter - At Night - In Forests - In Towns ....... It takes many different things to win a battle. No one individual can possibly assemble them all, give them names, and hand them out as a guide which, if carefully followed, will guarantee future victories. But, by studying a successful engagement and learning what made it successful, a soldier may benefit by the experiences of other soldiers who have learned how to win battles the hard way. This issue of ARMY TALKS describes a few of the battles recently fought in France and Germany. The officers and men who won these victories explain the tactics they used and why. There are tips on how to fight at night ... lessons in forest combat ... notes on taking towns. They may help you open the rest of the road to Berlin. ..... Newscope - Two Un-"Forgotten" Fronts ..... Printed in England

Army Talks 1945 02 24A
Army Talks 1945 02 24A
Vol. III No. 8 ....... The Rumor Racket ....... Rumors are not confined to the ETO. One of the most disastrous rumors of the war occurred in the Southwest Pacific. Starting among Australians, it spread to U.S, troops arriving in New Guinea. According to the rumor, Atabrine, used as a suppressive for malaria, caused sexual impotence. Jungle fighters stopped taking Atabrine. When tablets were placed under the tongue of each soldier in formation by their company commanders, he held them until the CO was out of sight and then spit them out on the ground. As a result some units had almost eighty percent casualties from malaria. This one rumor caused more than five times as many casualties as Jap guns, and almost resulted in a disastrous American defeat. Rumors can be more deadly than bullets. .... More About the G.I. Bill of Rights ..... Newscope - The Economic Front ..... Printed in France

Army Talks 1945 03 03
Army Talks 1945 03 03
Vol. III No. 9 ....... Homefront and Total War ....... Soldiers in the ETO have received a one-sided picture of the homefront because newspapers and radio are concerned with what is unusual or sensational. No one pretends that the homefront record is perfect. At the same time, no one, Hitler and Hirohito least of all, can sneeze at what the homefront has done. In this issue "Army Talks" presents the other side of the picture - the good side. .... You, Your Mail and the Censor ..... Newscope - Military Objective: The Po Valley ..... Printed in France

Army Talks 1945 03 10
Army Talks 1945 03 10
Vol. III No. 8 ....... The Rumor Racket ....... Rumors are not confined to the ETO. One of the most disastrous rumors of the war occurred in the Southwest Pacific. Starting among Australians, it spread to U.S, troops arriving in New Guinea. According to the rumor, Atabrine, used as a suppressive for malaria, caused sexual impotence. Jungle fighters stopped taking Atabrine. When tablets were placed under the tongue of each soldier in formation by their company commanders, he held them until the CO was out of sight and then spit them out on the ground. As a result some units had almost eighty percent casualties from malaria. This one rumor caused more than five times as many casualties as Jap guns, and almost resulted in a disastrous American defeat. Rumors can be more deadly than bullets. .... More About the G.I. Bill of Rights ..... Newscope - The Economic Front ..... Printed in England

Army Talks 1945 03 10A
Army Talks 1945 03 10A
Vol. III No. 10 ....... The "Big Three" at Yalta ....... Yalta, in the Crimea, scene of the recent "Big Three*" Conference, is hundreds of miles from the mud of the Western Front. No one in the world, however, is more closely concerned with the accomplishments of the conference than the US soldier. Because the military strategy agreed upon there will influence the duration of the war in the ETO, because the steps taken to tool-up the peace you are fighting for will have a direct bearing on your life for years to come, ARMY TALKS presents a few background facts about the conference and the complete text of the joint statement issued by Marshal Stalin, Prime Minister Churchill and President Roosevelt at the close of their eight-day meeting. ..... Printed in France

Army Talks 1945 03 17
Army Talks 1945 03 17
Vol. III No. 9 ....... Homefront and Total War ....... Soldiers in the ETO have received a one-sided picture of the homefront because newspapers and radio are concerned with what is unusual or sensational. No one pretends that the homefront record is perfect. At the same time, no one, Hitler and Hirohito least of all, can sneeze at what the homefront has done. In this issue "Army Talks" presents the other side of the picture - the good side. .... You, Your Mail and the Censor ..... Newscope - Military Objective: The Po Valley ..... Printed in England

Army Talks 1945 03 17A
Army Talks 1945 03 17A
Vol. III No. 11 ....... Operation Jackson - The Story of Airborne Troops ....... The men who dropped from the skies in parachutes and gliders at Ste. Mere Eglise, Carentan, Arnhem and Nijmegen were tough. They had to be tough to live. But these airborne men aren't rugged individualists. Airborne men work, plan and fight together, depending on each other not only for the success of great battles, but for their lives. Like an arrow, they are flung deep into the heart of the enemy's defenses. Should they fail to carry out their job of disrupting enemy communications, securing key roads and bridges, diverting a large part of the enemy's tactical reserves from the established front, and destroying supply dumps, the vast, integrated attack might possibly fail. The bow - the tanks, infantry, artillery, engineers and all other combat and supply organizations - must then seek out the arrow, cutting through enemy lines in a swift lunge to link with the airborne troops. ..... Printed in France

Army Talks 1945 03 24
Army Talks 1945 03 24
Detailed updates coming

Army Talks 1945 03 31
Army Talks 1945 03 31
Vol. III No. 13 ....... What Home Folks Think ....... PUBLIC! opinion poll is, in a way, a modern Town Meeting. It gives the individual a chance to stand up, sound off, and be counted. The modern method of polling is highly scientific and the polls are accurate. For instance, in the last presidential election the largest margin of error in four national polls (conducted by different research organizations) was 1.7%; one of the polls was off by only 0.3%. Results of polls are carefully studied by leaders in business and government. During the past few years public opinion in the US has gradually changed from an attitude of "hands off foreign squabbles" to recognition of its obligations and self-interest in international affairs. Until the change took place, Congress was clearly divided into two camps on the subject of isolationism. Public opinion polls gave a voice to the wishes of the man in the street - and Congressional sentiment changed. The importance of such polls is now recognized to the extent that before certain legislation is even proposed it is tested on the public. Public opinion polls enable citizens to register their likes and dislikes between elections. That is democracy in action. Recently the results of hundreds of national opinion polls were collected in a book, Mandate from the, People. To show the direction in which the thinking of Americans is headed, Army Talks presents from the book a summary of subjects in which the soldier has an interest. Some of the results are encouraging, some are surprising. While no single poll may be vised as a crystal-ball, taken together they may very well reveal the shape of tomorrow's world. ..... Printed in France

Army Talks 1945 04 14
Army Talks 1945 04 14
Vol. III No. 14 ....... War and Peace After 1918 ....... Ask almost anyone when World War I ended and the reply is likely to be : 11 November 1918. But that date is wrong, actually and legally. It was not even the end of the war for the United States. When did World War I end ? Armistice Day 1918 signified the end of formal, organized hostilities. The Versailles Peace Treaty was not signed until more than seven months later. Nearly two years elapsed before treaties were concluded with Germany's confederates, Austria-Hungary, Bulgaria and Turkey. Even this was not yet legal peace for the United States. Treaties had to be ratified. Finally, on 20 December 1921, more than three years after the Armistice, President Warren Gamaliel Harding was able to declare that "the state of war" involving us and all our enemies had ceased. As soon as "Cease Fire" sounded on that memorable Armistice Day most of the world expected a speedy return to "normalcy." Millions of people took it as a signal that the war was over. They shared the belief that a sharp dividing bar separated "war" and "peace" - that the hurdle could be taken in one quick jump.

Army Talks 1945 04 17
Army Talks 1945 04 17
Vol. III No. 15 ....... What About Manpower ....... Newsfront ..... Today, right now, the US is faced with an acute manpower crisis. The increased pace of the War has brought increased casualties and demands for more and more supplies. More men in uniform and more war workers are needed. ZI troops (Continental USA) have been combed out and few qualified men are left in civilian life. Every trained, fit soldier is needed for more duty.

Army Talks 1945 04 24
Army Talks 1945 04 24
Vol. III No. 16 ....... What is America? ....... Newsfront - 2500-Mile Sentry Line ..... The people in the United States sometimes sing a song, "America the Beautiful !" America is beautiful. Ask any man about his State and his eyes will light up. Where, he will ask, are there lakes that compare with our lakes ? Where are there forests greater than our forests ? Where are the fruit-trees more beautiful or fields richer in grain? Where can one lift his eyes to more beautiful mountains or look down into more fertile valleys ? America is beautiful, but it's not beauty alone that makes men love America. America is rich. Over one-third of all the minerals in the world are in the United States. Its developed water resources and water power have no rivals. It produces nearly two-thirds of the world's oil and almost 40% of the world's fuel and power. The United States has over 600,000,000 acres of forests and woodlands and nearly 900,000,000 acres of fertile farm land. No doubt Hitler's agents have seen great American power plants producing electricity for the American people. They know its automobile factories and shipyards turn out cars and ships. The Japs are aware that the face of America is crossed with 234,000 miles of railroads and 700,000 miles of highways. America is full of the promises of worldly goods. But it is not for its great wealth alone that Americans risk their lives in this war. America is a land of culture. It prints more books, has more symphony orchestras, more movies and stage production, more newspapers and magazines, more art galleries, more libraries, more colleges and universities than any other nation. There is culture aplenty for those who want it. Or the American way of life will allow one to be a bum on his own terms if he prefers. It has far-famed cities. New York is known the world over. Chicago is a word that means something in the farthest corner of the earth. Pittsburgh, New Orleans, Washington, D.C., San Francisco. A song can be written with the names of United States cities. It would tell of good food, lovely women, romance, great churches, movie stars, beer, iron ranges, lumber mills, baseball, great opportunities. The United States is more than great cities, culture, wealth and beauty. America is also people and ideas.

Army Talks 1945 05 01
Army Talks 1945 05 01
Vol. III No. 17 ....... Five Points of U.S. Foreign Policy ....... Newsfront - Among the Ruins of Berlin ..... Roosevelt is Gone by Walter Lippmann ....... The main objectives of US foreign policy as outlined several times recently by Secretary of State Edward R. Stettinius provide a blueprint for our present military, diplomatic and economic policies. Here they are as he stated them to Congress and to the Inter-American Conference in Mexico City: 1. ... To give the fullest possible support for our armed forces so that the war may be won at the earliest possible moment. 2. ... To take any steps necessary to prevent Germany and Japan from ever again having the military or industrial power to make war. 3. ... To establish at the earliest possible moment a united international organization to build and maintain peace - by force, if necessary - for generations to come. 4. ... To promote a great expansion of our foreign trade and of productiveness and trade throughout the world so that we can maintain full employment in our own country - and together with the other United Nations - and enter on an era of constantly expanding production and consumption and of rising standards of living. 5. ... To encourage all those conditions of international life favorable to development by men and women everywhere of the institutions of a free and democratic way of life in accordance with their own customs and desires.

Army Talks 1945 05 08
Army Talks 1945 05 08
Vol. III No. 18 ....... The San Francisco Conference ....... Newsfront - The Japs They Left Behind ..... The Legion of the Lost ..... The San Francisco Conference - Golden Gate to the Future ..... Ex-Axis

Army Talks 1945 05 15
Army Talks 1945 05 15
Vol. III No. 19 ....... Lend-Lease Fact And Fiction ....... Newsfront - Japan's Front Yard ..... Lend-Lease Fact And Fiction ..... How the Japs Ruined the Philippines ..... The Philippines New Role

Army Talks 1945 05 22
Army Talks 1945 05 22
Vol. IV No. 2 ....... ETO Record ....... Newsfront - Japan's Front Yard ..... From D-day to D+224 ..... Battle of Germany - D+224 to D+337 ..... Bombs over the Reich ..... Who Won the War?

Army Talks 1945 05 29
Army Talks 1945 05 29
Vol. IV No. 3 ....... Background To The Pacific ....... Battle Order of the Allies by Hanson W. Baldwin ..... Japan's Co-Prosperity Sphere ..... The Allies Strike Back ..... We Fulfill a Promise ..... The Battle for Burma ..... Logistics - our battle against Geography ..... How Strong is Japan? ..... The Japanese Emperor ..... The Enemy - The Jap by A. G. Fox

Army Talks 1945 06 05
Army Talks 1945 06 05
Vol. IV No. 4 ....... Our Job In Germany ....... Newsfront - The Pattern Of Liberation ..... Our Job In Germany ..... Germany's Disgrace by Walter Lippmann ..... In These Six Days Germany Lost the War by T/4 Thomas S. Hyland ..... Gotterdammerung by Vernon McKenzie ..... Survival by Scott I. Duthie ..... What Penalty? ..... And So A Government Was Started by Laird Briscoe ..... Control Germany? Certainly! But How? ..... This Is (and Was) Bavaria

Army Talks 1945 06 12
Army Talks 1945 06 12
Vol. IV No. 5 ....... Teamwork Homefront - Our Allies ....... What About the Home front? ..... From VE to VJ ..... Battle of the Atlantic ..... Battle of the Pacific ..... Champs ..... Red Banners, White Flags ..... RAF ..... Rebirth of the French Army ..... The Mediterranean Theater ..... Brothers Under the Skin

Army Talks 1945 06 19
Army Talks 1945 06 19
Vol. IV No. 6 ....... Problems of Peace ....... Newsfront - Hotspots Trieste - Hotspots Syria and the Lebanon ..... Ideals and Teeth ..... San Francisco Conference ..... Five Lessons for Peace Makers by Harold Nicolson ..... War May Cost Trillion Dollars ..... What the British Empire has Learned Since 1776 by Phyllis Bentley ..... What the US has Learned since 1823 ..... What the USSR has Learned since 1917 ..... What I have Learned in the Past Three Years ..... Peace by Force: Germany by James Bryant Conant ..... Peace by Force: Japan

Army Talks 1945 06 26
Army Talks 1945 06 26
Vol. IV No. 7 ....... GI Bill Of Rights ....... Education and job Training ..... Guaranty of Loans ..... Unemployment Allowances ..... Job Finding Assistance

Army Talks 1945 07 03
Army Talks 1945 07 03
Vol. IV No. 8 ....... Post-War Plans ....... Newsfront - "Chinese Incident" - in Reverse ..... Post-War Plans of US Troops ..... In General ..... Going Back "Home" ..... Starting a Business ..... Down on the Farm ..... Working for Wages ..... A Government Job ..... Back to School ..... An Army Career

Army Talks 1945 07 10
Army Talks 1945 07 10
Vol. IV No. 9 ....... Legacy of Fascism ....... Crime and Pnishment ..... What the Homefront Thinks ..... Joseph Pulitzer's Report on German Murder Mills ..... Hitler-Mussolini Ideas Still Endanger Europe

Army Talks 1945 07 17
Army Talks 1945 07 17
Vol. IV No. 10 ....... Spadework for Victory ....... Strategy is a Lot of Things ..... Defeat of the German Navy ..... Task Force FEA ..... East by North, East by South ..... For Ten Weeks Normandy Became an Island ..... Letters to the Editor

Army Talks 1945 07 29
Army Talks 1945 07 29
Vol. IV No. 11 ....... Focus: The Orient ....... Cover: US Bomber suprises Jap destroyer off the Philippines ....... Articles: Notes on the Navy ..... What to do with Japan? ..... Our Ally - China ..... Half a Million By-Passed Japs

Army Talks 1945 08 05
Army Talks 1945 08 05
Vol. IV No. 12 ....... European Theater Since VE-Day ....... Articles: Musical Chairs ..... Double Objective ..... Second Halk Kick-off ..... Full Speed in Reverse ..... Test Tube for International Cooperation

Army Talks 1945 08 19
Army Talks 1945 08 19
Vol. IV No. 13-14 ....... Our Ally - The USSR ....... Cover: Soviet police woman at Torgau. She has killed 42 German soldiers. ....... Articles: Revolution in High Gear ..... What the USSR Taught Germany ..... Understanding the Red Soldier

Army Talks 1945 08 26
Army Talks 1945 08 26
Vol. IV No. 15 ....... Germany Priority Problems ....... Cover: Lt Gen Lucius Clay against backdrop of typical German scenery. ....... Articles: Functions of the Control Council ..... "Here in Germany - There are so Many Boys Our Own Age!" ..... German Big Wigs Prepare Their Alibis ..... Billions in Looted Art ..... Fair But Hard ..... Open Truths vs. Closed Minds ..... Some Germans Believe ..... Germany's Secret Weapons

Army Talks 1945 09 02
Army Talks 1945 09 02
Vol. IV No. 16 ....... Pacific Problems ....... Articles: Frontier Fiction ..... Korea Waits for Freedom ..... Pacific Map ..... Red Banner Army ..... Three Strikes - and Out ..... All the Comforts of a Jungle ..... The Fabulous East Indies ..... Letters

Army Talks 1945 09 09
Army Talks 1945 09 09
Vol. IV No. 17 ....... Alphabet Agencies ....... Cover: This is the way American occupation troops would like it. Not all Sergeants, however, will find things as lush as Gerald McWilliams did in Munich ....... Articles: AEP ( Army Education Program ) ..... USRRA ( United States Riviera Recreation Area ) ..... USO ( United Service Organizations ) ..... UNRRA ( United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration ) ..... Letters

Army Talks 1945 09 16
Army Talks 1945 09 16
Vol. IV No. 18 ....... The Voices of Freedom ....... Articles: Words are Weapons ..... RAF Carries the Ball ..... Col. Britton and... ..... Leaflets ..... PWD Leaflet Campaign in ETO ..... Radio ..... Mobile P. A. S. ..... The Voice tht Failed ..... After 12 Years: The Truth ..... The Army Talks

Army Talks 1945 09 23
Army Talks 1945 09 23
Detailed updates coming

Army Talks 1945 09 30
Army Talks 1945 09 30
Detailed updates coming

Army Talks 1945 10 07
Army Talks 1945 10 07
Detailed updates coming

Army Talks 1945 10 14
Army Talks 1945 10 14
Vol. IV No. 22 ....... France Reaches for Her Boot Straps ....... Articles: France Reaches for Her Boot Straps ..... Blacks, Browns and Whites ..... VD ..... Purge Progress In Italy ..... Highballing to Victory ..... Why We Are Here

Army Talks 1945 10 21
Army Talks 1945 10 21
Vol. IV No. 23 ....... About Jobs ....... Articles: No Substitute for Skill and Experience ..... 10 US Mayors Interviewed ..... The Annual Wage Plan ..... Apprentice Training ..... Your Separation Qualification Record ..... A Jod in a Gray Suit ..... History of Veterans' Organizations ..... The American Legion ..... Veretans of Foreign Wars ..... Disabled American Veterans ..... New Veterans Groups ..... The Army Talks

Army Talks 1945 10 28
Army Talks 1945 10 28
Vol. IV No. 24 ....... Military Government in Action ....... Articles: Why We Are Here ..... Denazification ..... Will the Germans Starve? ..... Education ..... Map ..... DPs ..... Justice in Germany ..... Politics in Swaddling Clothes ..... The Meaning of Victory ..... The Army Talks

Army Talks 1945 11 04
Army Talks 1945 11 04
Vol. IV No. 25 ....... Separation Center Diary ....... Articles: Separation Center Diary ..... Beyond Sovereignty Lies War ..... United Nations Organization ..... Festering Frontiers ..... Problems of Peace

Army Talks 1945 11 11
Army Talks 1945 11 11
Vol. IV No. 26 ....... War Criminals ....... Articles: What Happened to War Criminals Last Time ..... The Case of the Human Guinea Pigs ..... Death on the T/O ..... 24 Verses Humanity ..... Economic Vampire ..... Decline and Fall of German Industry

Army Talks 1945 11 18
Army Talks 1945 11 18
Vol. IV No. 27 ....... German Propaganda ....... Articles: Between Two Wars ..... What Goebbels Told the Germans About the US Amry ..... After 12 Years, The Truth ..... Achtung! Counterfeiters At Work ..... Nazi Justice ..... Topkick of a German City ..... The Army Talks

Army Talks 1945 11 25
Army Talks 1945 11 25
Vol. IV No. 28 ....... Reconversion ....... Articles: Out line of Plans Made for the Reconversion Period ..... Bridgeport Community Center Plan ..... Home Building ..... Atomic Energy ..... Public Works ..... From Battlefield to Bargain Counter ..... Using War Plants in Peace ..... Debunking the Myths of Foreign Trade ..... The Army Talks

Army Talks 1945 12 02
Army Talks 1945 12 02
Vol. IV No. 29 ....... 4 Years After Pearl Harbor ....... Articles: Occupation of Japan ..... China: 1937 vs 1945 ..... Hawaii, the 49th Star? ..... Mankind Awaits Liberation from Malaria ..... Alaska ..... War Weather

Army Talks 1945 12 09
Army Talks 1945 12 09
Vol. IV No. 30 ....... GI Insurance ....... Articles: GI Insurance ..... Insurance Salesmen in ODs ..... Special Operations - OSS ..... Mind Reading Across No Man's Land ..... Behind that Curtain ..... Daisies Won't Tell - But Krauts Did ..... Old Man Rumor ..... Premium Rates on NSLI

Army Talks 1945 12 16
Army Talks 1945 12 16
Vol. IV No. 31 ....... Three Rs ....... Articles: Reconstruction ..... Rehabilitation ..... UNRRA ..... Gateway to Recovery ..... Achtung! Minen ..... From the Ruins, a New Rouen ..... Your Own Business

Army Talks 1945 12 30
Army Talks 1945 12 30
Vol. IV No. 33 ....... Working for Wages ....... Articles: One Man's Job Is Everybody's Job ..... What You Can Don As A Civilian With Your Army Training ..... In Soviet Ukraine ..... civilian Jobs in the ETO ..... GI Small Business




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